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Alzheimer's & Dementia

Sad lonely pensive old senior woman

In 2012, there were over 43 million people in the United States who were 65 or older. Of these people, about 5.2 million have Alzheimer’s disease – a type of dementia that impairs memory, thinking and behavior. Currently, Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and costs over $200 billion annually. Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that can be difficult to recognize initially. However, there are important warning signs to be aware of. These include:

  • Memory loss that disrupts daily life
  • Challenges in planning or solving problems
  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure
  • Confusion with time or place
  • Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
  • New problems with words in speaking or writing
  • Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps.
  • Decreased or poor judgment
  • Withdrawal from work or social activities
  • Changes in mood and personality

Although there is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, there are treatment options to improve a person’s overall quality of life. If you have concerns that a friend or family member may be exhibiting some of these symptoms, please search our database to contact support. Also consider searching for a support group to learn more information.

For additional information, please consider these resources:

    

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