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Diabetes

diabetes

Did you know that in the United States more than 18 million people are currently diagnosed with diabetes? And did you know that by 2050 it is estimated that about 48 million people will have diabetes in the United States? Diabetes, a disease that impacts how your body uses blood glucose or sugar, is currently the 7th leading cause of death in the United States and has a relationship with kidney disease, heart disease, and other major health problems. But diabetes is also correlated with depression, anxiety and other mental health problems that can be extremely debilitating.

Although there is no known cure for diabetes, there are multiple treatment steps you can take to improve your quality of life. For example, exercising regularly and engaging in relaxation techniques to diminish stress may be helpful.

If you have diabetes and are experiencing feelings of sadness and hopelessness or are having thoughts of harming yourself, please know that there is help available to you. Please search our database of licensed psychologists or consider using The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, which also offers a wide variety of online and in-person services.

Diabetes is a complicated medical condition that requires individual care to improve the quality of your life. One important aspect of care is your mental health and ensuring that psychological symptoms do not exacerbate the severity of this disease. Please contact support today!

Additional information about diabetes can be found below:

My Story: When Diabetes Burnout Strikes by Kelly Kunik

My Story: When Diabetes Burnout Strikes by Kelly Kunik

My diabetes burnout comes in waves and not always necessarily when you’d expect. Sometimes it strikes when I’m packing for a trip and my diabetes supplies take up more room then I think it has a right to. And in those moments I wish I could chuck my Diabetes and my diabetes supplies out the window and for good.

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Are You a Moody Diabetic?

Are You a Moody Diabetic?

In the United States over 25 million people live with diabetes. The main types of diabetes – Type 1 and Type 2 – impact millions of Americans every day and may lead to physical health problems like kidney disease, stroke, and hearing or vision problems. However, what many people don’t realize is that diabetes influences a person’s physical and mental health.

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Eating Ourselves to Full by Dr. Suzanne R. Engelman

Eating Ourselves to Full by Dr. Suzanne R. Engelman

“Emotional-eating” is a term to describe eating in response to emotions, rather than hunger cues. Emotional eating is a type of “emotional dysregulation”, which is a maladaptive attempt to cope with stressful and uncomfortable affective or cognitive.

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Psychological Factors in Bariatric (Weight Loss) Surgery by Dr. Rudy Nydegger

Psychological Factors in Bariatric (Weight Loss) Surgery by Dr. Rudy Nydegger

In recent years, bariatric (weight loss) surgery has become a viable option for many patients for whom weight is a significant health issue. Bariatric surgery has been available for decades, but surgical and medical improvements in recent years have made this surgery appropriate for more patients. In addition, the surgery is now minimally invasive, so the post-surgical discomfort and recovery time are significantly less than in the past.

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Emotional Weight Gain

Emotional Weight Gain

New year, new resolutions. Has anyone ever seen a gym more crowded than in January? While many people resolve to lose weight each year, it is often harder than it looks. Some people use food as a means to cope emotionally, rather than to fill them up when they are actually hungry.

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