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Suicide

suicide

In 2010, it is estimated that 105 people in the United States died by suicide each day- that is one person every 14 minutes. As the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, suicide impacts people regardless of age, gender, race, or sexual orientation. Some research suggests that every suicide influences at least six other people emotionally and/or psychologically.

Many people mistakenly believe that contemplating suicide is a sign of weakness. There are reasons why people consider or attempt suicide but being a weak person is not one of them.

Here are four general characteristics of a person who may be suicidal:

  • They have feelings of depression such as sadness and diminished interest in activities
  • They have strong feelings of hopelessness and/or helplessness
  • They want help but find it difficult to ask
  • They don’t really want to die; they want to stop living

Other significant warning signs may include suicidal ideation (for example, threatening to kill oneself), substance abuse, purposelessness, high anxiety, social withdrawal, anger, and/or dramatic mood changes.

Many people have thoughts or feelings about wanting to harm themselves. If you or another person you know is experiencing thoughts like these, please search our database of psychologists to contact support. Another option is to call the 24-hour National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Please consider these resources to learn more: 

  

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Suicide Prevention: The Role of Family and Friends by Dr. Rudy Nydegger

Suicide Prevention: The Role of Family and Friends by Dr. Rudy Nydegger

In some cases a suicide might seem rational (like someone dying of a terrible disease who wants to end their life), and perhaps it is, but if the suicide is the result of a treatable condition like depression, then perhaps that condition should be treated so that the patient can make a more “rational” decision about living or dying.

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Helping Loved Ones Who Self-Injure by Dr. Wendy E. Goetz

Helping Loved Ones Who Self-Injure by Dr. Wendy E. Goetz

Finding out that someone you care about is intentionally hurting themselves can be a scary, confusing, and shocking experience. It can be hard to understand why a person would seek out physical pain, particularly if you have not noticed any concerning signs otherwise.

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Life After Loss By Dr. Joy Lere

Life After Loss By Dr. Joy Lere

Loss can create a very deep, dark chasm in our hearts and world. Over time—often much more quickly than you feel equipped to face it—you are forced to fall into to the putting-one-foot-in-front-of-the-other existence that life requires following loss. The language we use around grief is critical.

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Using Words to Contend with Feelings by Dr. Barney Greenspan

Using Words to Contend with Feelings by Dr. Barney Greenspan

The use of words is often least appreciated when mastering feelings. In infants, feelings are experienced as bodily sensations, pleasant or unpleasant, and are communicated through bodily actions (screaming, crying and as motility develops, in kicking, pushing, hitting and running).

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