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Traumatic Brain Injury

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Every year about 1.7 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States. Of these people, more than 270,000 are hospitalized and more than 50,000 die from their injury.

Although TBI happens for many reasons, it generally occurs after acute damage to the brain from things like head injury, tumor, infection, or stroke. There are many causes of TBI, but the three most common include car accidents, firearms, and falls. Several types of TBI exist that can all cause lasting damage to individuals and their families.

The first type is called mild TBI and is defined by confusion, disorientation, fatigue, memory loss, irritability, or a loss of consciousness for less than thirty minutes. Mild TBI, which is often called a concussion or a minor head trauma, is the most common form of TBI and often goes undetected.

The second type is known as moderate to severe TBI and involves a loss of consciousness for more than thirty minutes. In addition, severe TBI may result in significant cognitive deficits, language impairments, seizures, or severe sensory or emotional regulation difficulties.

Every day TBI impacts countless people across the United States. If you are concerned about TBI, please search our database of psychologists to contact support.

Consider the resources listed below to learn more!

Psychologist Spotlight: Virtually Cured

Psychologist Spotlight: Virtually Cured

Marat Zanov and Dawn McDaniel each earned Ph.D.s in psychology at USC Dornsife. After following different career paths, the two friends now work together to treat post-traumatic stress disorder using virtual reality software developed at USC.

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Psychologist Spotlight: Demystifying Symptoms and Promoting Recovery After a Concussion by Dr. Chand Taneja

Psychologist Spotlight: Demystifying Symptoms and Promoting Recovery After a Concussion by Dr. Chand Taneja

As a neuropsychologist, I am fortunate to be in the position to assist children and adults in their recovery after brain injury by means of educational consultations, neuropsychological evaluations, and research. Mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), in other words concussions, are a major public health issue in today’s youth, accounting for nearly 38% of pediatric emergency room visits. Many more go undiagnosed, particularly when there is no loss of consciousness.

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The Value of Early Detection

The Value of Early Detection

For a variety of reasons, sometimes people don’t realize they are living with a mental health disorder until the symptoms start impairing their day-to-day lives. But what if people were able to detect mental health conditions earlier, before symptoms were able to diminish a person’s functioning? If you or a person you know is living with psychological distress, it’s very important to contact someone for support early; early intervention and treatment oftentimes lead to more positive outcomes for the individual’s daily life. Speak to a psychologist today!

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