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Abuse

anxiety

Abuse is a behavior where one person imposes physical, emotional, sexual, economic, or psychological maltreatment to maintain or gain control over another person. Of those who experience abuse, women account for 85%, with women ages 20-24 at greater risk.   Additionally, there are over 3 million reports of child abuse in the United States each year, and unfortunately 80% of children that die from abuse are under the age of 4.

There are many forms of abuse, and often times the signs are not visible.  Abusive actions that intimidate, manipulate, or humiliate emotionally are as common as those behaviors which cause physical pain.  If you are experiencing abuse, speak out and seek help immediately.  Report the abuse to someone you trust.  If your safety is threatened call the police.

Abuse can lead to serious lifelong psychological and physical problems. Common problems for those who experience abuse include anxiety, depression, substance abuse, posttraumatic stress disorder, suicidal thoughts and actions, social phobia, and panic disorders. A psychologist can help you cope with these problems.  Please search our database of psychologists to contact support.

Visit the resources below for additional information:

Online Bullying and Cyberbullying by Dr. Rosalind S. Dorlen

Online Bullying and Cyberbullying by Dr. Rosalind S. Dorlen

From our archives: More than one in five children in the U.S. has been bullied and nearly 40 percent report having been assaulted by other youths, according to 2010 data from the U.S. Department of Justice. The Centers for Disease Control considers bullying to be a major public health problem.

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Introducing the FindaPsychologist Toolkit!

Introducing the FindaPsychologist Toolkit!

Our lives are complicated. Recognizing that you need to find someone to talk to about your concerns can be the stepping stone to a healthy physical and mental well-being. The question is how do you find that someone?

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Using Words to Contend with Feelings by Dr. Barney Greenspan

Using Words to Contend with Feelings by Dr. Barney Greenspan

The use of words is often least appreciated when mastering feelings. In infants, feelings are experienced as bodily sensations, pleasant or unpleasant, and are communicated through bodily actions (screaming, crying and as motility develops, in kicking, pushing, hitting and running).

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